IRS Tax Tip 2018-81: Special tax benefits for armed forces

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IRS Tax Tips May 24, 2018

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Issue Number:    Tax Tip 2018-81


Special tax benefits for armed forces

Members of the military and their families are often eligible for certain tax breaks. For example, members of the armed forces don't have to pay taxes on some types of income. Special rules could also lower the tax they owe or give them more time to file and pay taxes.

No matter what time of the year, it's good for members of the military and their spouses to familiarize themselves with these benefits. Here are some things for these taxpayers to know about their taxes:

  • Combat pay exclusion. If someone serves in a combat zone, part or even all of their combat pay is tax-free. This also applies to people working in an area outside a combat zone when the Department of Defense certifies that area is in direct support of military operations in a combat zone. There are limits to this exclusion for commissioned officers.

  • Deadline extensions. Some members of the military, such as those who serve in a combat zone, can postpone most tax deadlines. Those who qualify can get automatic extensions of time to file and pay their taxes.

  • Earned income tax credit. If those serving get nontaxable combat pay, they may choose to include it in their taxable income to increase the amount of EITC. That means they could owe less tax or get a larger refund.

  • Signing joint returns. Normally, both spouses must sign a joint income tax return. If military service prevents that, one spouse may be able to sign for the other or get a power of attorney.

  • ROTC allowances. Some amounts paid to ROTC students in advanced training are not taxable. This applies to allowances for education and subsistence. Active duty ROTC pay is taxable. For instance, pay for summer advanced camp is taxable.

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