Long-term brain sensing + US News ranking + yo-yo champ + epic water war

 
September 15, 2018
Greetings! Here’s a roundup of the latest from the MIT community.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Long-term Sensing
Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, and depression are linked to dopamine deficits. Neuroscientists have now devised a way to track dopamine levels in the brain for more than a year, which may clarify its role in both healthy and diseased brains.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Top Headlines
MIT named No. 3 university by US News
Undergraduate engineering program is No. 1; undergraduate business program is No. 2.
MIT Heat Island
Smoothing out sketches’ rough edges
MIT-developed tool improves automated image vectorization, saving digital artists time and effort.
MIT Heat Island
MIT alumnus and GM engineer returns to campus to inspire student innovation
Will Dickson ’14 is trailblazing new ways to spark collaborations and scout talent.
MIT Heat Island
MIT Open Access Task Force releases white paper
Paper provides an overview of efforts to make research and scholarship more freely and openly available.
MIT Heat Island
Effort to support postsecondary education in prison will be housed at MIT
A multi-university consortium will look to transform the lives of incarcerated people through education.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
#ThisIsMIT
Tweet via @FTMag 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
In the Media
How to convince someone global warming is real? Play this game // NBC News
Researchers at MIT and UMass Lowell have found a role-playing game helps people discover the urgency of climate change and motivates them to act.
Role models tell girls that STEM’s for them in new campaign // The New York Times
Amy Fitzgerald, Edgerton Center outreach program coordinator, says the Ad Council’s new “She Can STEM” campaign aimed at girls “could have a big effect.” It’s vital to feature women who get their hands dirty, she says. “Girls, especially, do not have an idea of the range of possibilities.”
Little bot swims through pipes to see if they’re leaking // Fast Company
A robot that can identify leaks in pipes could help with a pressing global challenge. You Wu SM ’14, PhD ’18 estimates that “if half of the leaks in the world could be found and fixed, that would recover enough water to support 1 billion people.”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Meet Your MIT Neighbor
Name: Matt Burns
Affiliation: Cashier at LaVerde’s Market
Years at MIT: 10
Hometown: Berlin, New Hampshire
Favorite vacation spot: London
Musicians you love: Rolling Stones, Ian Hunter, The Replacements
Sports team: All the Boston teams
Last great book you read:
“Since We Fell” by Dennis Lehane
Secret superpower: I’m a drummer in a couple of bands
Favorite thing about MIT: WMBR 88.1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Watch This
At MIT, six-time U.S. yo-yo champion Alex Hattori has been able to combine his passion for yo-yoing and his fascination with robotics. Thanks to the Institute’s makerspaces, the mechanical engineering senior says he started making yo-yos “as soon as I got to MIT.” Last fall, he advanced his skills by creating 50 identical yo-yos using different processes in course 2.008 (Design and Manufacturing II).
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
It’s hall-of-fame-level type advertising. Not to mention the signal it sends given the current climate.
—Renée Gosline, MIT Sloan School of Management senior lecturer and expert in brands and social media, on a recent Nike ad supporting Colin Kaepernick, an NFL player who has ignited controversy by kneeling during the national anthem in protest of police brutality
This edition of the MIT Weekly was brought to you by the water battle of the century. 💦

Thanks for reading, and have a great week!

—Maia, MIT News Office
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